Category Archives: disclosurepolicy

FVB’s Disclosure Policy

Hey, it’s me, Dan Rua.

Florida Venture Blog by Dan Rua is my personal blog focused on a variety of topics. In addition to sharing perspective, experience and opinions, I use this blog as a testbed for multiple online technologies. In fact, much of this Disclosure Policy was built with the DP Generator over at DisclosurePolicy.org. If you ever wonder whether a piece of FVB content adheres to this policy, just email me your questions/concerns and I’ll address as best I can.

I appreciate your support of FVB, hope you’ll subscribe and encourage you to join the FVB community. As always, enjoy yourself while here and comment often!

This policy is valid from 1 July 2011

This blog is a personal blog written and edited by me. For questions about this blog, please contact dan at inflexionvc dot com.

This blog may accept forms of cash advertising, sponsorship, paid insertions or other forms of compensation.

This blog abides by the WOMMA Word of Mouth Marketing Ethics Code. I believe in honesty of relationship, opinion and identity. The compensation received may influence the advertising content, topics or posts made in this blog, but not the opinions I share. That content, advertising space or post will be clearly identified as paid or sponsored content.

I am not retained and compensated to provide opinion on products, services, websites and various other topics. The views and opinions expressed in the posts, but not the comments, of this blog are purely mine. I will only endorse products or services that I believe are worthy of such endorsement. Any product claim, statistic, quote or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer or provider.

I would like to disclose the following existing relationships. These are companies, organizations or individuals that may have a significant impact on the content of this blog. I am a Managing Partner with Inflexion Partners, an early-stage venture capital fund. I have a financial interest in the following that may be relevant to my blogging: Persystent, CallMiner, GroovesharkVisible Assets, IZEA, and RedPath.  I serve on the following corporate, advisory or non profit boards: CallMinerGTECGAIN, and the Florida Institute for the Commercialization of Public Research.

Thanks for reading this far down and I encourage you to take the DP challenge. The future of consumer generated media could depend on it!

Tags: DisclosurePolicy

PayPerPost Gets Some Love, and Gives Some

Arrington had some nice things to say about one of my portfolio companies today. So did Scoble. Interesting that neither one touched the topic of undisclosed affiliate marketing bloggers — a multi-billion dollar FTC magnet (supposedly 40% of Amazon sales come from affiliate links — with disclosure requirements entirely absent in their Operating Agreement). Luckily, PPP’s Disclosure Policy framework can help all those affiliate bloggers who have hundreds of undisclosed aff posts in their SE-indexed archives…

That’s not the only thing PPP is helping with. They just launched another $1000 puzzle — about RockStartup. If you haven’t already found RockStartup, the world’s first real-time reality show, check out what it’s like in the belly of a venture-backed startup. After you’ve done that, collect this piece #19 and find/assemble the full puzzle first to win $1000.

Happy Birthday FVB!

Well loyal readers (even that guy who found FVB just because he googled for “horse porn“), it’s been a great year.

My goal for the past year was to blog at least once a week on a variety of Florida, Venture Capital and Technology topics. CHECK! Since that time I’ve done 80 diverse posts, kicked off the FVB community (thanks MyBlogLog!), created a mind-blowing stir by backing THE Consumer Generated Advertising Marketplace (PayPerPost: try it, you’ll like it!), helped launch DisclosurePolicy.org and met a ton of great people in Florida and beyond. A nice surprise was how many non-Floridians follow FVB for general VC topics or to track Florida startup activity.

If next year brings the same level of learning, discussion, networking and investments; I think I’ll just explode. So, to FVB’s subscribers, community members and casual readers, I present a year-end KangaRua — thanks for reading and keep coming back!

B-L-O-G Your Way to Transparency with DisclosurePolicy.org

One of my portfolio companies, PayPerPost, launched DisclosurePolicy.org today and I just posted the following at blog.DisclosurePolicy.org. The topic of transparency is much larger than PayPerPost, but I’m glad they took the initiative to create long-term solutions instead of band-aids that could hamper CGM long-term. The site offers a Disclosure Policy generator, transparency best practices, model DPs, DP.org badges and forums to discuss the entire spectrum of transparency. The forums even include some fun “DP Hunts” where you can try to find the Disclosure Policies of the ‘rich & famous’ bloggers — I’m stumped. 😉

If you write a blog, head over to DisclosurePolicy.org, get yourself a DP and B-L-O-G your way to transparency…

[from blog.disclosurepolicy.org]

Welcome to DisclosurePolicy.org, the ‘big bang’ of various forces created to maximize transparency across our ever-expanding Consumer Generated Media universe. At launch, the site doesn’t have all the answers to transparency, but we hope it has some and focuses discussion on the rest.

In concert with the resources provided here, I’d like to share an easy 4-step approach (B-L-O-G) to embracing transparency and diversity of opinion across CGM. Although I reference ‘blogs’ for simplicity, this approach applies to all CGM properties whether they involve text, video, audio, photos or social networks. Here’s all it takes:

Build a clear Disclosure Policy that matches the goals, nature and audience of your blog — built at DisclosurePolicy.org or by hand.
Link to that Discosure Policy with the phrase “Disclosure Policy” in some standard place (e.g. top, sidebar, bottom) from every page of your blog.
Open your eyes and mind to the fact that people blog for different reasons, from different cultures and for different audiences — thus, what works for you may not work for others.
Go forth and blog, in a manner consistent with your Disclosure Policy.

If you follow these four simple B-L-O-G steps, you’ve given every existing or new visitor to your blog the opportunity to know a little more about you and the ground rules of your blog. With that knowledge they are free to stay or leave, and you are free to blog with pride that you have helped take CGM to a level of transparency beyond any other media.

Tags: DisclosurePolicy